Linen

Good for nature, Good for people.

The positive qualities of linen begin on the field: careful and traditional flax cultivation protects the soil and respects delicate ecosystems. Tough fibres form the basis of a material that is solid, reliable, robust, tear-resistant and holds its shape, providing the pleasure of long-term use.
  • linen: good for nature, good for people.
  • linen: good for nature, good for people.
  • linen: good for nature, good for people.

Instructions for being happy:

positive influence on the sleeping behaviour

First instruction

It is no fairytale: linen has a very positive influence on the sleeping behaviour of people. That has been shown in studies. It not only ensures a perfect atmosphere in bed, but it also engenders marvellous wearing comfort in clothing.
Linen is antistatic, repels dirt and dust and is anti-allergic

Second instruction

Linen is wonderfully antistatic, repels dirt and dust and its anti-allergic characteristics are very greatly appreciated by fairytale princesses and other people with fine sensibilities.
Linen is tremendously tear resistant

Third instruction

Linen is tremendously tear resistant. That is good during high passion.
Moreover, one can even cover seating furniture and cover walls with this wonderful material.
Linen is exceptionally dirt resistant

Fourth instruction

Due to the smooth surface of linen fibre and its natural wax cover, linen is exceptionally dirt resistant. Therefore have no fear when things get out of hand.
linen has the highest capacity for swelling and absorption

Fifth instruction

More than all other fibres linen has the highest capacity for swelling and absorption. Isn't that a super promise?
Easy care is a very essential characteristic of linen

Sixth instruction

Easy care is a very essential characteristic of linen. A washing temperature of 40 °C and a gentle washing liquid are optimal. And what is really super is that the more linen is washed, the lovelier it becomes.

tips for the proper care of linen

Care Instructions - Linen

Articles of clothing and household textiles from the LEITNER Leinen brand stay beautiful for a long time, regardless of whether they are washed with water or dry cleaned. To properly care for your linen it is particularly important to follow the manufacturer's advice carefully, which for most of our products are found on the sewn-in label on the reverse side on the left side seam. The care instructions take into account the various steps in the product's manufacturing journey, including the type and strength of the yarn, the composition of the fabric, the colouring, and the equipment used.

from seed to fabric

Harvest time begins in July, when the flax has dropped all the leaves from it lower third. The harvest itself is made up of several phases. The stage where the plants are pulled from the earth and arranged on the field is most often followed by retting on the ground. Mother Nature takes over at this point, loosening the fibrous skins from their woody cores with sun and rain. The plants are then seeded, and the flax fibres and cores mechanically separated. The next stop for the dried, cleaned and combed flax fibres, also known as long fibres, is the spinning mill, where yarn is extracted from them for use in the weaving mill. And it is in the weaving mill that what was once a tiny seed finally becomes the fabric that dreams are made of.
  • Harvest time begins in July, when the flax has dropped all the leaves from it lower third.
  • The harvest itself is made up of several phases.
  • The harvest itself is made up of several phases.
  • The stage where the plants are pulled from the earth and arranged on the field is most often followed by retting on the ground.
  • The plants are then seeded, and the flax fibres and cores mechanically separated.
  • Then the flax fibres have to be cleaned and combed.
  • The next stop for the dried, cleaned and combed flax fibres, also known as long fibres, is the spinning mill
  • When it arrives there, yarn is extracted from them for use in the weaving mill.
  • The fibres are now ready for LEITNER Leinen
  • In the weaving mill, the fibres are put into the machine as thick cords
  • And it is in the weaving mill that what was once a tiny seed finally becomes the fabric that dreams are made of

a material as old as mankind

Linen is among the world’s oldest textile fibres. Early discoveries have been dated at 36,000 years BC. The very first examples of an apparatus for weaving can be seen in Egyptian reliefs and wall decoration from about 4000 BC. During this same era deceased dignitaries were wrapped in linen and mummified to conserve their bodies for posterity – an early example of confidence in the robust qualities of linen fibres.

Linen as a decorative element with integrated patters travelled via the trade routes to Europe where weaving technicians refined it over the centuries. Thanks to the opulence of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the damask weave became fashionable, while at the same time the use of the flax plant became more numerous. The production of sails and of linseed oil – the latter both for strengthening the body and for preserving works of art – are just two examples.

In the 17th and 18th century, linen had a competitor in woven silk and cotton from North America. Nonetheless, linen retained its status as the “kitchen towel’, a basic essential, and as an "imitation silk", a fashionable alternative for the poorer members of society.

When the first mechanical weaving loom made its appearance at the beginning of the 19th century, it resulted in a decisive change in the manufacture of textiles. The manufacture of linen was stamped with the influence of the industrialisation process right up to the 21st century. This not only has created numerous creative possibilities for linen, it has smoothed the way for this light and airy material to enter the postmodern era.
Production of linen

more Information

www.mastersoflinen.com

Payment

Delivery

Free of charge from 100€ of order value *
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Certificates

return & withdrawal

Possible within 14 days *
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Address

F. Leitner KG
Stifterstraße 25
4161 Ulrichsberg
Austria
Tel: +43 (0) 7288 7017
Fax: +43 (0) 7288 7017-50

opening hours factory outlet

Monday to Friday
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Saturday
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.


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